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How Far Can Your Skills Take You

This paper provides new evidence to characterize changes in the demand for skills associated with shifts in occupations for a sample of 10 of the G20 countries, using information available from LinkedIn profiles as a new and unique source of dynamic labor market data on occupations and skills. A unique feature of LinkedIn’s data is the availability of granular measures of skill importance by country and occupation. This data allows us to examine how similar occupations may differ in their skills composition across different countries, and to measure the corresponding shifts in skill demand associated with changes in occupations for each locality. Our analysis yielded several key conclusions and recommendations for Argentina, Brazil, Chile, and Mexico.

Who Drives on Ride-Hailing Platforms in Latin America?: A Profile of Uber Drivers in Brazil, Chile, Colombia and Mexico

Digital platforms can improve the functioning of markets characterized by coordination problems and high levels of fragmentation, such as the transportation market. In recent years, the adoption of digital platforms across Latin America (Latam), notably in the ride-hailing sector, has been considerable. This expansion may increase the availability of better job alternatives for workers in the region, which is characterized by high levels of informality and citizen’s insecurity. To evaluate the viability of this hypothesis, we explored the characteristics of Uber drivers (UDs) by combining Uber administrative data with a survey designed and applied for this project. The characteristics we analyzed include drivers’ past and current labor profiles, labor aspirations, and financial behaviors.

Millennials in Latin America and the Caribbean: to work or study?

Youth is a critical stage in people's lives: a transition period in which transcendental decisions have to be made in many areas, especially in education and work. Knowing what lies behind the choice between studying and working, or the combination of both, allows to assist, through the formulation of public policies, those who seek to ensure a better future for the next generation of workers in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC). This objective is a priority due to changes in the labor market, marked by the emergence of new technological advances that threaten to automate tasks and occupations.

The Future of Work in Latin America and the Caribbean: A Great Opportunity for the Region?

In this first issue of “The future of work in Latin America and the Caribbean” series, we approach this topic from a general perspective with the idea of offering a conceptual framework to set the coordinates for the debate. First, we address the two major trends that, in our opinion, will shape the labor market of the future: the technologic tsunami and demographic aging. Their potential impacts in the world of work, as we explain later, will be of great relevance for countries in Latin America and the Caribbean, of which we offer some interesting data to promote this conversation. Finally, we present what actions and strategies can be activated to face this still uncertain scenario. *For a correct visualization of this note, we recommend using the free programs Adobe Reader and Flash Player.

Should I Stay or Should I Go?: Career Choices for Young Workers in Latin America

Labor market institutions shape the return to workers’ skills. They define the incentives of firms and workers to invest in general and specific skills, affecting the returns to experience and tenure. This paper presents an empirical assessment of this hypothesis. We take advantage of rich administrative data from Brazil and Chile, two countries with different regulatory frameworks. We focus on young workers as they face to a greater extent the trade-off between accumulating general or specific skills. The analysis is motivated by a simple conceptual framework, from which we derive empirical predictions. It takes into account the potential endogeneity of occupational choices, while allowing for heterogenous returns to tenure and experience. We find positive average returns to both dimensions in both countries, with larger returns to tenure in Brazil and larger returns to experience in Chile. This is consistent with the original conjecture as the more rigid labor market legislation in Brazil encourages firms to carry out additional investments in young workers’s specific skills. Chile’s institutions, on the contrary, promote the acquisition of general skills. We further examine how these returns differ by educational attainment, an important policy consideration in the region, and find that more educated workers in both countries face larger returns to experience and tenure relative to their less educated counterparts.

Education and Health, The Sectors of The Future?

In this interactive note, the second issue of the series "The future of work in Latin America and the Caribbean", we analyze the evolution of the labor market in the education and health sectors. Not only do we observe that employment has grown considerably in the last four decades, but that jobs in education and health are good quality jobs -especially for women-. In addition, the study projects the number of teachers, doctors and nurses that the countries of the region will need in the coming years. * For a correct visualization of this note, we recommend the use of the free Adobe Reader and Flash Player programs.

The Future of Work in Latin America and the Caribbean: A Great Opportunity for the Region?

In this first issue of “The future of work in Latin America and the Caribbean” series, we approach this topic from a general perspective with the idea of offering a conceptual framework to set the coordinates for the debate. First, we address the two major trends that, in our opinion, will shape the labor market of the future: the technologic tsunami and demographic aging. Their potential impacts in the world of work, as we explain later, will be of great relevance for countries in Latin America and the Caribbean, of which we offer some interesting data to promote this conversation. Finally, we present what actions and strategies can be activated to face this still uncertain scenario. *For a correct visualization of this note, we recommend using the free programs Adobe Reader and Flash Player.

The Future of Work in Latin America and the Caribbean: A Great Opportunity for the Region?

In this first issue of “The future of work in Latin America and the Caribbean” series, we approach this topic from a general perspective with the idea of offering a conceptual framework to set the coordinates for the debate. First, we address the two major trends that, in our opinion, will shape the labor market of the future: the technologic tsunami and demographic aging. Their potential impacts in the world of work, as we explain later, will be of great relevance for countries in Latin America and the Caribbean, of which we offer some interesting data to promote this conversation. Finally, we present what actions and strategies can be activated to face this still uncertain scenario. *For a correct visualization of this note, we recommend using the free programs Adobe Reader and Flash Player.

Millennials in Latin America and the Caribbean: to work or study?

Youth is a critical stage in people's lives: a transition period in which transcendental decisions have to be made in many areas, especially in education and work. Knowing what lies behind the choice between studying and working, or the combination of both, allows to assist, through the formulation of public policies, those who seek to ensure a better future for the next generation of workers in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC). This objective is a priority due to changes in the labor market, marked by the emergence of new technological advances that threaten to automate tasks and occupations.

The Future of Work in Latin America and the Caribbean: A Great Opportunity for the Region?

In this first issue of “The future of work in Latin America and the Caribbean” series, we approach this topic from a general perspective with the idea of offering a conceptual framework to set the coordinates for the debate. First, we address the two major trends that, in our opinion, will shape the labor market of the future: the technologic tsunami and demographic aging. Their potential impacts in the world of work, as we explain later, will be of great relevance for countries in Latin America and the Caribbean, of which we offer some interesting data to promote this conversation. Finally, we present what actions and strategies can be activated to face this still uncertain scenario. *For a correct visualization of this note, we recommend using the free programs Adobe Reader and Flash Player.

Who Drives on Ride-Hailing Platforms in Latin America?: A Profile of Uber Drivers in Brazil, Chile, Colombia and Mexico

Digital platforms can improve the functioning of markets characterized by coordination problems and high levels of fragmentation, such as the transportation market. In recent years, the adoption of digital platforms across Latin America (Latam), notably in the ride-hailing sector, has been considerable. This expansion may increase the availability of better job alternatives for workers in the region, which is characterized by high levels of informality and citizen’s insecurity. To evaluate the viability of this hypothesis, we explored the characteristics of Uber drivers (UDs) by combining Uber administrative data with a survey designed and applied for this project. The characteristics we analyzed include drivers’ past and current labor profiles, labor aspirations, and financial behaviors.

What Are the Most In-Demand Occupations and Emerging Skills in the Region?

In this interactive note, the third in the series "The future of Work in Latin America and the Caribbean," we combine traditional sources and new data sources to explore the impact that technological change has had on the evolution of occupations and skills demand in the region. In addition, we show the potential of a tool that works as a GPS of the labor market and that gives the opportunity for workers in Latin America and the Caribbean to detect the skills that will allow them to move from a declining occupation to an emerging one. * For a correct visualization of this note, we recommend the use of the free Adobe Reader and Flash Player programs.

The Effect of Job Referrals on Labor Market Outcomes in Brazil

This paper uses for the first time program administrative data from Brazil’s National Employment System (SINE) to assess the impact of SINE job interview referrals on labor market outcomes. Data for the five-year period 2012-2016 is used to evaluate the impact of SINE on employment probability, wage rates, time until reemployment and job tenure. Difference-in-differences estimates suggest that a SINE job interview referral increases the probability of finding a job within three months of the referral, and reduces the number of months to find reemployment, the average job tenure of the next job and the reemployment wage. Subgroup analysis suggests that compared to more educated workers, SINE is more effective in helping less educated workers by increasing their probability of finding a job and reducing time until reemployment. Finally, the evidence suggests that online labor exchange is less effective than the service provided in person at SINE offices.

Productivity, Misallocation, and Special Tax Regimes in the Dominican Republic

This paper advances understanding of the relationship between tax policy and productivity, taking advantage of unique data from the Dominican Republic to document a significant negative impact of tax regulations on total factor productivity (TFP). It begins by estimating productivity using administrative records provided by the tax authorities. Then, it estimates the extent to which misallocation of resources might be limiting TFP using the Hsieh and Klenow (HK) methodology. Finally, it analyzes the tax regulation and provides suggestive evidence about how some provisions might be contributing to the misallocation of resources observed in the Dominican Republic. The paper finds that if misallocation of resources is eliminated from the economy, TFP will increase by a factor of 3.5. Several regulations generate discontinuities in the average rate of taxation, and tax reductions designed for small businesses are actually used by large and unproductive firms, which may be contributing to the overall misallocation observed in the Dominican Republic.

Millennials in Latin America and the Caribbean: to work or study?

Youth is a critical stage in people's lives: a transition period in which transcendental decisions have to be made in many areas, especially in education and work. Knowing what lies behind the choice between studying and working, or the combination of both, allows to assist, through the formulation of public policies, those who seek to ensure a better future for the next generation of workers in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC). This objective is a priority due to changes in the labor market, marked by the emergence of new technological advances that threaten to automate tasks and occupations.

How Far Can Your Skills Take You

This paper provides new evidence to characterize changes in the demand for skills associated with shifts in occupations for a sample of 10 of the G20 countries, using information available from LinkedIn profiles as a new and unique source of dynamic labor market data on occupations and skills. A unique feature of LinkedIn’s data is the availability of granular measures of skill importance by country and occupation. This data allows us to examine how similar occupations may differ in their skills composition across different countries, and to measure the corresponding shifts in skill demand associated with changes in occupations for each locality. Our analysis yielded several key conclusions and recommendations for Argentina, Brazil, Chile, and Mexico.

Education and Health, The Sectors of The Future?

In this interactive note, the second issue of the series "The future of work in Latin America and the Caribbean", we analyze the evolution of the labor market in the education and health sectors. Not only do we observe that employment has grown considerably in the last four decades, but that jobs in education and health are good quality jobs -especially for women-. In addition, the study projects the number of teachers, doctors and nurses that the countries of the region will need in the coming years. * For a correct visualization of this note, we recommend the use of the free Adobe Reader and Flash Player programs.

Millennials in Latin America and the Caribbean: to work or study?

Youth is a critical stage in people's lives: a transition period in which transcendental decisions have to be made in many areas, especially in education and work. Knowing what lies behind the choice between studying and working, or the combination of both, allows to assist, through the formulation of public policies, those who seek to ensure a better future for the next generation of workers in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC). This objective is a priority due to changes in the labor market, marked by the emergence of new technological advances that threaten to automate tasks and occupations.

Millennials in Latin America and the Caribbean: to work or study?

Youth is a critical stage in people's lives: a transition period in which transcendental decisions have to be made in many areas, especially in education and work. Knowing what lies behind the choice between studying and working, or the combination of both, allows to assist, through the formulation of public policies, those who seek to ensure a better future for the next generation of workers in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC). This objective is a priority due to changes in the labor market, marked by the emergence of new technological advances that threaten to automate tasks and occupations.

Education and Health, The Sectors of The Future?

In this interactive note, the second issue of the series "The future of work in Latin America and the Caribbean", we analyze the evolution of the labor market in the education and health sectors. Not only do we observe that employment has grown considerably in the last four decades, but that jobs in education and health are good quality jobs -especially for women-. In addition, the study projects the number of teachers, doctors and nurses that the countries of the region will need in the coming years. * For a correct visualization of this note, we recommend the use of the free Adobe Reader and Flash Player programs.

The Future of Work in Latin America and the Caribbean: A Great Opportunity for the Region?

In this first issue of “The future of work in Latin America and the Caribbean” series, we approach this topic from a general perspective with the idea of offering a conceptual framework to set the coordinates for the debate. First, we address the two major trends that, in our opinion, will shape the labor market of the future: the technologic tsunami and demographic aging. Their potential impacts in the world of work, as we explain later, will be of great relevance for countries in Latin America and the Caribbean, of which we offer some interesting data to promote this conversation. Finally, we present what actions and strategies can be activated to face this still uncertain scenario. *For a correct visualization of this note, we recommend using the free programs Adobe Reader and Flash Player.

Millennials in Latin America and the Caribbean: to work or study?

Youth is a critical stage in people's lives: a transition period in which transcendental decisions have to be made in many areas, especially in education and work. Knowing what lies behind the choice between studying and working, or the combination of both, allows to assist, through the formulation of public policies, those who seek to ensure a better future for the next generation of workers in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC). This objective is a priority due to changes in the labor market, marked by the emergence of new technological advances that threaten to automate tasks and occupations.

Gender-Segmented Labor Markets and the Effects of Local Demand Shocks

Gender segmentation in the labor market is widespread. However, most existing studies of the effects of labor demand shocks on local economies assume away gender. In this paper, I show that local labor demand shocks can lead to different outcomes depending on whether they favor male or female employment. I develop a spatial equilibrium model that features gender segmented labor markets and joint mobility frictions, which predicts that couples are more likely to migrate in response to male opportunities. As a result, positive shocks to local labor demand for men lead to population growth, increases in female labor supply, and housing demand growth. Meanwhile, equivalent shocks to labor demand for women lead to smaller inflows of migrant workers, and labor force participation is a relatively more important margin of adjustment in this case. I find strong empirical support for the model’s predictions in the context of Brazil during 1991-2010. Comparing the effects of gender-specific labor demand shocks, I show that male shocks produce a higher migratory response and make localities more populated and expensive. These results imply that place-making policies that create jobs for females are more likely to benefit residents while those that create male jobs are more likely to benefit immigrants and landlords.

The Future of Work in Latin America and the Caribbean: A Great Opportunity for the Region?

In this first issue of “The future of work in Latin America and the Caribbean” series, we approach this topic from a general perspective with the idea of offering a conceptual framework to set the coordinates for the debate. First, we address the two major trends that, in our opinion, will shape the labor market of the future: the technologic tsunami and demographic aging. Their potential impacts in the world of work, as we explain later, will be of great relevance for countries in Latin America and the Caribbean, of which we offer some interesting data to promote this conversation. Finally, we present what actions and strategies can be activated to face this still uncertain scenario. *For a correct visualization of this note, we recommend using the free programs Adobe Reader and Flash Player.

The Future of Work in Latin America and the Caribbean: A Great Opportunity for the Region?

In this first issue of “The future of work in Latin America and the Caribbean” series, we approach this topic from a general perspective with the idea of offering a conceptual framework to set the coordinates for the debate. First, we address the two major trends that, in our opinion, will shape the labor market of the future: the technologic tsunami and demographic aging. Their potential impacts in the world of work, as we explain later, will be of great relevance for countries in Latin America and the Caribbean, of which we offer some interesting data to promote this conversation. Finally, we present what actions and strategies can be activated to face this still uncertain scenario. *For a correct visualization of this note, we recommend using the free programs Adobe Reader and Flash Player.

The Future of Work in Latin America and the Caribbean: A Great Opportunity for the Region?

In this first issue of “The future of work in Latin America and the Caribbean” series, we approach this topic from a general perspective with the idea of offering a conceptual framework to set the coordinates for the debate. First, we address the two major trends that, in our opinion, will shape the labor market of the future: the technologic tsunami and demographic aging. Their potential impacts in the world of work, as we explain later, will be of great relevance for countries in Latin America and the Caribbean, of which we offer some interesting data to promote this conversation. Finally, we present what actions and strategies can be activated to face this still uncertain scenario. *For a correct visualization of this note, we recommend using the free programs Adobe Reader and Flash Player.

What Are the Most In-Demand Occupations and Emerging Skills in the Region?

In this interactive note, the third in the series "The future of Work in Latin America and the Caribbean," we combine traditional sources and new data sources to explore the impact that technological change has had on the evolution of occupations and skills demand in the region. In addition, we show the potential of a tool that works as a GPS of the labor market and that gives the opportunity for workers in Latin America and the Caribbean to detect the skills that will allow them to move from a declining occupation to an emerging one. * For a correct visualization of this note, we recommend the use of the free Adobe Reader and Flash Player programs.

How Far Can Your Skills Take You

This paper provides new evidence to characterize changes in the demand for skills associated with shifts in occupations for a sample of 10 of the G20 countries, using information available from LinkedIn profiles as a new and unique source of dynamic labor market data on occupations and skills. A unique feature of LinkedIn’s data is the availability of granular measures of skill importance by country and occupation. This data allows us to examine how similar occupations may differ in their skills composition across different countries, and to measure the corresponding shifts in skill demand associated with changes in occupations for each locality. Our analysis yielded several key conclusions and recommendations for Argentina, Brazil, Chile, and Mexico.

The Future of Work in Latin America and the Caribbean: A Great Opportunity for the Region?

In this first issue of “The future of work in Latin America and the Caribbean” series, we approach this topic from a general perspective with the idea of offering a conceptual framework to set the coordinates for the debate. First, we address the two major trends that, in our opinion, will shape the labor market of the future: the technologic tsunami and demographic aging. Their potential impacts in the world of work, as we explain later, will be of great relevance for countries in Latin America and the Caribbean, of which we offer some interesting data to promote this conversation. Finally, we present what actions and strategies can be activated to face this still uncertain scenario. *For a correct visualization of this note, we recommend using the free programs Adobe Reader and Flash Player.

Education and Health, The Sectors of The Future?

In this interactive note, the second issue of the series "The future of work in Latin America and the Caribbean", we analyze the evolution of the labor market in the education and health sectors. Not only do we observe that employment has grown considerably in the last four decades, but that jobs in education and health are good quality jobs -especially for women-. In addition, the study projects the number of teachers, doctors and nurses that the countries of the region will need in the coming years. * For a correct visualization of this note, we recommend the use of the free Adobe Reader and Flash Player programs.

Skill Premium, Labor Supply and Changes in the Structure of Wages in Latin America

Earnings inequality declined rapidly in Argentina, Brazil and Chile during the 2000s. A reduction in the experience premium is a fundamental driver of declines in upper-tail (90/50) inequality, while a decline in the education premium is the primary determinant of the evolution of lower-tail (50/10) inequality. Relative labor supply is important for explaining changes in the skill premiums. Relative demand trends favored high-skilled workers during the 1990s, shifting in favor of low-skilled workers during the 2000s. Changes in the minimum wage, and more importantly, commodity-led terms of trade improvements are key factors behind these relative skill demand trends.

The Future of Work in Latin America and the Caribbean: A Great Opportunity for the Region?

In this first issue of “The future of work in Latin America and the Caribbean” series, we approach this topic from a general perspective with the idea of offering a conceptual framework to set the coordinates for the debate. First, we address the two major trends that, in our opinion, will shape the labor market of the future: the technologic tsunami and demographic aging. Their potential impacts in the world of work, as we explain later, will be of great relevance for countries in Latin America and the Caribbean, of which we offer some interesting data to promote this conversation. Finally, we present what actions and strategies can be activated to face this still uncertain scenario. *For a correct visualization of this note, we recommend using the free programs Adobe Reader and Flash Player.

Education and Health, The Sectors of The Future?

In this interactive note, the second issue of the series "The future of work in Latin America and the Caribbean", we analyze the evolution of the labor market in the education and health sectors. Not only do we observe that employment has grown considerably in the last four decades, but that jobs in education and health are good quality jobs -especially for women-. In addition, the study projects the number of teachers, doctors and nurses that the countries of the region will need in the coming years. * For a correct visualization of this note, we recommend the use of the free Adobe Reader and Flash Player programs.

Education and Health, The Sectors of The Future?

In this interactive note, the second issue of the series "The future of work in Latin America and the Caribbean", we analyze the evolution of the labor market in the education and health sectors. Not only do we observe that employment has grown considerably in the last four decades, but that jobs in education and health are good quality jobs -especially for women-. In addition, the study projects the number of teachers, doctors and nurses that the countries of the region will need in the coming years. * For a correct visualization of this note, we recommend the use of the free Adobe Reader and Flash Player programs.

The Future of Work in Latin America and the Caribbean: A Great Opportunity for the Region?

In this first issue of “The future of work in Latin America and the Caribbean” series, we approach this topic from a general perspective with the idea of offering a conceptual framework to set the coordinates for the debate. First, we address the two major trends that, in our opinion, will shape the labor market of the future: the technologic tsunami and demographic aging. Their potential impacts in the world of work, as we explain later, will be of great relevance for countries in Latin America and the Caribbean, of which we offer some interesting data to promote this conversation. Finally, we present what actions and strategies can be activated to face this still uncertain scenario. *For a correct visualization of this note, we recommend using the free programs Adobe Reader and Flash Player.

Education and Health, The Sectors of The Future?

In this interactive note, the second issue of the series "The future of work in Latin America and the Caribbean", we analyze the evolution of the labor market in the education and health sectors. Not only do we observe that employment has grown considerably in the last four decades, but that jobs in education and health are good quality jobs -especially for women-. In addition, the study projects the number of teachers, doctors and nurses that the countries of the region will need in the coming years. * For a correct visualization of this note, we recommend the use of the free Adobe Reader and Flash Player programs.

The Future of Work in Latin America and the Caribbean: A Great Opportunity for the Region?

In this first issue of “The future of work in Latin America and the Caribbean” series, we approach this topic from a general perspective with the idea of offering a conceptual framework to set the coordinates for the debate. First, we address the two major trends that, in our opinion, will shape the labor market of the future: the technologic tsunami and demographic aging. Their potential impacts in the world of work, as we explain later, will be of great relevance for countries in Latin America and the Caribbean, of which we offer some interesting data to promote this conversation. Finally, we present what actions and strategies can be activated to face this still uncertain scenario. *For a correct visualization of this note, we recommend using the free programs Adobe Reader and Flash Player.

What Are the Most In-Demand Occupations and Emerging Skills in the Region?

In this interactive note, the third in the series "The future of Work in Latin America and the Caribbean," we combine traditional sources and new data sources to explore the impact that technological change has had on the evolution of occupations and skills demand in the region. In addition, we show the potential of a tool that works as a GPS of the labor market and that gives the opportunity for workers in Latin America and the Caribbean to detect the skills that will allow them to move from a declining occupation to an emerging one. * For a correct visualization of this note, we recommend the use of the free Adobe Reader and Flash Player programs.

The Future of Work in Latin America and the Caribbean: A Great Opportunity for the Region?

In this first issue of “The future of work in Latin America and the Caribbean” series, we approach this topic from a general perspective with the idea of offering a conceptual framework to set the coordinates for the debate. First, we address the two major trends that, in our opinion, will shape the labor market of the future: the technologic tsunami and demographic aging. Their potential impacts in the world of work, as we explain later, will be of great relevance for countries in Latin America and the Caribbean, of which we offer some interesting data to promote this conversation. Finally, we present what actions and strategies can be activated to face this still uncertain scenario. *For a correct visualization of this note, we recommend using the free programs Adobe Reader and Flash Player.

Comparing the Results of Youth Training Programs in Latin America and the Caribbean

The evidence on the effectiveness of youth training programs in Latin American and the Caribbean (LAC) tends to be encouraging regarding the quality of employment of beneficiaries (positive impacts are observed regarding the access to formal employment), although there is significant heterogeneity across countries and by gender of the beneficiaries. It is not clear how easily one can generalize from the results of an impact evaluation in a particular country. We address the underlying heterogeneity in the characteristics of the beneficiaries of youth training programs in LAC by relying on the individual-level data used in the experimental impact evaluations of three of these programs. We show that we can identify, and characterize, the individuals satisfying a common support condition, i.e. those who are similar across programs. We use non-experimental multiple treatment estimators to eliminate differences across programs, which work better for men than for women. For men satisfying common support (i.e. comparable), who have worse initial conditions than non-comparable individuals, the positive treatment effects on formality disappear for some programs. The results highlight the importance of treatment effect heterogeneity, which may have implications for focalization and program design. They also make explicit the limits to the external validity of each of the experiments, and how difficult is the interpretation of the results from meta-analysis studies. By stressing for which types of individuals it is possible to make comparisons across programs, our study points towards a more nuanced comparison of impact evaluation studies of youth training programs.

The Future of Work in Latin America and the Caribbean: A Great Opportunity for the Region?

In this first issue of “The future of work in Latin America and the Caribbean” series, we approach this topic from a general perspective with the idea of offering a conceptual framework to set the coordinates for the debate. First, we address the two major trends that, in our opinion, will shape the labor market of the future: the technologic tsunami and demographic aging. Their potential impacts in the world of work, as we explain later, will be of great relevance for countries in Latin America and the Caribbean, of which we offer some interesting data to promote this conversation. Finally, we present what actions and strategies can be activated to face this still uncertain scenario. *For a correct visualization of this note, we recommend using the free programs Adobe Reader and Flash Player.

What Are the Most In-Demand Occupations and Emerging Skills in the Region?

In this interactive note, the third in the series "The future of Work in Latin America and the Caribbean," we combine traditional sources and new data sources to explore the impact that technological change has had on the evolution of occupations and skills demand in the region. In addition, we show the potential of a tool that works as a GPS of the labor market and that gives the opportunity for workers in Latin America and the Caribbean to detect the skills that will allow them to move from a declining occupation to an emerging one. * For a correct visualization of this note, we recommend the use of the free Adobe Reader and Flash Player programs.

Millennials in Latin America and the Caribbean: to work or study?

Youth is a critical stage in people's lives: a transition period in which transcendental decisions have to be made in many areas, especially in education and work. Knowing what lies behind the choice between studying and working, or the combination of both, allows to assist, through the formulation of public policies, those who seek to ensure a better future for the next generation of workers in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC). This objective is a priority due to changes in the labor market, marked by the emergence of new technological advances that threaten to automate tasks and occupations.

How Far Can Your Skills Take You

This paper provides new evidence to characterize changes in the demand for skills associated with shifts in occupations for a sample of 10 of the G20 countries, using information available from LinkedIn profiles as a new and unique source of dynamic labor market data on occupations and skills. A unique feature of LinkedIn’s data is the availability of granular measures of skill importance by country and occupation. This data allows us to examine how similar occupations may differ in their skills composition across different countries, and to measure the corresponding shifts in skill demand associated with changes in occupations for each locality. Our analysis yielded several key conclusions and recommendations for Argentina, Brazil, Chile, and Mexico.

The Future of Work in Latin America and the Caribbean: A Great Opportunity for the Region?

In this first issue of “The future of work in Latin America and the Caribbean” series, we approach this topic from a general perspective with the idea of offering a conceptual framework to set the coordinates for the debate. First, we address the two major trends that, in our opinion, will shape the labor market of the future: the technologic tsunami and demographic aging. Their potential impacts in the world of work, as we explain later, will be of great relevance for countries in Latin America and the Caribbean, of which we offer some interesting data to promote this conversation. Finally, we present what actions and strategies can be activated to face this still uncertain scenario. *For a correct visualization of this note, we recommend using the free programs Adobe Reader and Flash Player.

What Are the Most In-Demand Occupations and Emerging Skills in the Region?

In this interactive note, the third in the series "The future of Work in Latin America and the Caribbean," we combine traditional sources and new data sources to explore the impact that technological change has had on the evolution of occupations and skills demand in the region. In addition, we show the potential of a tool that works as a GPS of the labor market and that gives the opportunity for workers in Latin America and the Caribbean to detect the skills that will allow them to move from a declining occupation to an emerging one. * For a correct visualization of this note, we recommend the use of the free Adobe Reader and Flash Player programs.

Training, Soft Skills and Productivity: Evidence from a Field Experiment in Retail

Understanding the causal association between skills and productivity is essential for designing effective training programs. This paper evaluates an intervention aimed at boosting leadership and communication skills among store managers and sales associates from a large Latin American retailer. The empirical analysis is carried out using longitudinal information gathered by the firm and through two skills surveys. The Identification exploits the experimental design in the context of a difference-in-difference strategy. The results indicate large positive effects of the training program on store-level productivity. We further link these Findings to individual-level performance measures. In particular, we document positive effects on total sales and numbers of transactions for all workers. Regarding the mechanisms, we provide evidence suggesting that the intervention was more effective in boosting leadership skills than communication skills. Spillovers from trained managers to untrained sales representatives also contribute to the main effects. Our findings point towards the possibility of increasing productivity through training programs targeting critical skills.

The Future of Work in Latin America and the Caribbean: A Great Opportunity for the Region?

In this first issue of “The future of work in Latin America and the Caribbean” series, we approach this topic from a general perspective with the idea of offering a conceptual framework to set the coordinates for the debate. First, we address the two major trends that, in our opinion, will shape the labor market of the future: the technologic tsunami and demographic aging. Their potential impacts in the world of work, as we explain later, will be of great relevance for countries in Latin America and the Caribbean, of which we offer some interesting data to promote this conversation. Finally, we present what actions and strategies can be activated to face this still uncertain scenario. *For a correct visualization of this note, we recommend using the free programs Adobe Reader and Flash Player.

Education and Health, The Sectors of The Future?

In this interactive note, the second issue of the series "The future of work in Latin America and the Caribbean", we analyze the evolution of the labor market in the education and health sectors. Not only do we observe that employment has grown considerably in the last four decades, but that jobs in education and health are good quality jobs -especially for women-. In addition, the study projects the number of teachers, doctors and nurses that the countries of the region will need in the coming years. * For a correct visualization of this note, we recommend the use of the free Adobe Reader and Flash Player programs.

Education and Health, The Sectors of The Future?

In this interactive note, the second issue of the series "The future of work in Latin America and the Caribbean", we analyze the evolution of the labor market in the education and health sectors. Not only do we observe that employment has grown considerably in the last four decades, but that jobs in education and health are good quality jobs -especially for women-. In addition, the study projects the number of teachers, doctors and nurses that the countries of the region will need in the coming years. * For a correct visualization of this note, we recommend the use of the free Adobe Reader and Flash Player programs.

Education and Health, The Sectors of The Future?

In this interactive note, the second issue of the series "The future of work in Latin America and the Caribbean", we analyze the evolution of the labor market in the education and health sectors. Not only do we observe that employment has grown considerably in the last four decades, but that jobs in education and health are good quality jobs -especially for women-. In addition, the study projects the number of teachers, doctors and nurses that the countries of the region will need in the coming years. * For a correct visualization of this note, we recommend the use of the free Adobe Reader and Flash Player programs.

What Are the Most In-Demand Occupations and Emerging Skills in the Region?

In this interactive note, the third in the series "The future of Work in Latin America and the Caribbean," we combine traditional sources and new data sources to explore the impact that technological change has had on the evolution of occupations and skills demand in the region. In addition, we show the potential of a tool that works as a GPS of the labor market and that gives the opportunity for workers in Latin America and the Caribbean to detect the skills that will allow them to move from a declining occupation to an emerging one. * For a correct visualization of this note, we recommend the use of the free Adobe Reader and Flash Player programs.

Education and Health, The Sectors of The Future?

In this interactive note, the second issue of the series "The future of work in Latin America and the Caribbean", we analyze the evolution of the labor market in the education and health sectors. Not only do we observe that employment has grown considerably in the last four decades, but that jobs in education and health are good quality jobs -especially for women-. In addition, the study projects the number of teachers, doctors and nurses that the countries of the region will need in the coming years. * For a correct visualization of this note, we recommend the use of the free Adobe Reader and Flash Player programs.

Education and Health, The Sectors of The Future?

In this interactive note, the second issue of the series "The future of work in Latin America and the Caribbean", we analyze the evolution of the labor market in the education and health sectors. Not only do we observe that employment has grown considerably in the last four decades, but that jobs in education and health are good quality jobs -especially for women-. In addition, the study projects the number of teachers, doctors and nurses that the countries of the region will need in the coming years. * For a correct visualization of this note, we recommend the use of the free Adobe Reader and Flash Player programs.

Job Hunting: Looking for The Most Suitable Location of Public Employment Offices in Brazil

The location of offices of public employment services matters. It can bring jobseekers and vacancies closer together to accelerate the matching process and make the best use of resources. In the case of Brazil, financial consolidation calls for better job placement and better spending of public resources. In this line, the Labor Markets and Social Security Division (LMK) in cooperation with the Ministry of Labor developed a tool to objectively identify where offices of public employment services (PES) could be (re)located to spend resources more efficiently. Using a three-stage methodology, this technical note presents and discusses the tool to indicate where the most suitable locations for offices of employment services should be to increase the probability of finding a job and filling a vacancy. The first stage computes a ranking of PES offices employing variables of demand and supply of labor as well as the intermediation capacity of PES offices. The second stage replicates this index at a municipality level to determine the potential of municipalities to host PES offices. Finally, we combine both stage with georeferenced parameters such as distance to transport stations and capital cities to map where PES offices should be located, allowing end-users to control the influence of variables in determining spatial suitability.

Who Drives on Ride-Hailing Platforms in Latin America?: A Profile of Uber Drivers in Brazil, Chile, Colombia and Mexico

Digital platforms can improve the functioning of markets characterized by coordination problems and high levels of fragmentation, such as the transportation market. In recent years, the adoption of digital platforms across Latin America (Latam), notably in the ride-hailing sector, has been considerable. This expansion may increase the availability of better job alternatives for workers in the region, which is characterized by high levels of informality and citizen’s insecurity. To evaluate the viability of this hypothesis, we explored the characteristics of Uber drivers (UDs) by combining Uber administrative data with a survey designed and applied for this project. The characteristics we analyzed include drivers’ past and current labor profiles, labor aspirations, and financial behaviors.

Education and Health, The Sectors of The Future?

In this interactive note, the second issue of the series "The future of work in Latin America and the Caribbean", we analyze the evolution of the labor market in the education and health sectors. Not only do we observe that employment has grown considerably in the last four decades, but that jobs in education and health are good quality jobs -especially for women-. In addition, the study projects the number of teachers, doctors and nurses that the countries of the region will need in the coming years. * For a correct visualization of this note, we recommend the use of the free Adobe Reader and Flash Player programs.

Millennials in Latin America and the Caribbean: to work or study?

Youth is a critical stage in people's lives: a transition period in which transcendental decisions have to be made in many areas, especially in education and work. Knowing what lies behind the choice between studying and working, or the combination of both, allows to assist, through the formulation of public policies, those who seek to ensure a better future for the next generation of workers in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC). This objective is a priority due to changes in the labor market, marked by the emergence of new technological advances that threaten to automate tasks and occupations.

The Future of Work in Latin America and the Caribbean: A Great Opportunity for the Region?

In this first issue of “The future of work in Latin America and the Caribbean” series, we approach this topic from a general perspective with the idea of offering a conceptual framework to set the coordinates for the debate. First, we address the two major trends that, in our opinion, will shape the labor market of the future: the technologic tsunami and demographic aging. Their potential impacts in the world of work, as we explain later, will be of great relevance for countries in Latin America and the Caribbean, of which we offer some interesting data to promote this conversation. Finally, we present what actions and strategies can be activated to face this still uncertain scenario. *For a correct visualization of this note, we recommend using the free programs Adobe Reader and Flash Player.

Education and Health, The Sectors of The Future?

In this interactive note, the second issue of the series "The future of work in Latin America and the Caribbean", we analyze the evolution of the labor market in the education and health sectors. Not only do we observe that employment has grown considerably in the last four decades, but that jobs in education and health are good quality jobs -especially for women-. In addition, the study projects the number of teachers, doctors and nurses that the countries of the region will need in the coming years. * For a correct visualization of this note, we recommend the use of the free Adobe Reader and Flash Player programs.

What Are the Most In-Demand Occupations and Emerging Skills in the Region?

In this interactive note, the third in the series "The future of Work in Latin America and the Caribbean," we combine traditional sources and new data sources to explore the impact that technological change has had on the evolution of occupations and skills demand in the region. In addition, we show the potential of a tool that works as a GPS of the labor market and that gives the opportunity for workers in Latin America and the Caribbean to detect the skills that will allow them to move from a declining occupation to an emerging one. * For a correct visualization of this note, we recommend the use of the free Adobe Reader and Flash Player programs.

What Are the Most In-Demand Occupations and Emerging Skills in the Region?

In this interactive note, the third in the series "The future of Work in Latin America and the Caribbean," we combine traditional sources and new data sources to explore the impact that technological change has had on the evolution of occupations and skills demand in the region. In addition, we show the potential of a tool that works as a GPS of the labor market and that gives the opportunity for workers in Latin America and the Caribbean to detect the skills that will allow them to move from a declining occupation to an emerging one. * For a correct visualization of this note, we recommend the use of the free Adobe Reader and Flash Player programs.

Education and Health, The Sectors of The Future?

In this interactive note, the second issue of the series "The future of work in Latin America and the Caribbean", we analyze the evolution of the labor market in the education and health sectors. Not only do we observe that employment has grown considerably in the last four decades, but that jobs in education and health are good quality jobs -especially for women-. In addition, the study projects the number of teachers, doctors and nurses that the countries of the region will need in the coming years. * For a correct visualization of this note, we recommend the use of the free Adobe Reader and Flash Player programs.

Education and Health, The Sectors of The Future?

In this interactive note, the second issue of the series "The future of work in Latin America and the Caribbean", we analyze the evolution of the labor market in the education and health sectors. Not only do we observe that employment has grown considerably in the last four decades, but that jobs in education and health are good quality jobs -especially for women-. In addition, the study projects the number of teachers, doctors and nurses that the countries of the region will need in the coming years. * For a correct visualization of this note, we recommend the use of the free Adobe Reader and Flash Player programs.

Employment Cyclicality by Firm Size, Wage and Productivity in Brazil

The important debate about how economic fluctuations affect employment reallocation in heterogeneous businesses is currently open in the literature. This debate is relevant as it matters for the understanding of the labor market dynamics, and for devising labor policies that aim at dampening employment fluctuations. The theoretical literature suggests that job-to-job flows reallocate workers from low productivity to high productivity firms and often this pattern is tested assuming that firm size, wages and productivity are positively related. This paper constructs a unique monthly linked employer-employee data based on the Annual Manufacturing Survey (PIA) and contributes to this debate by providing direct empirical evidence on the cyclicality of employment in heterogeneous firms in a developing country. Results produced by classifying firms by employment size, wage or productivity show different responses of employment growth rates to business cycles. The relationship between these variables is not as strong as suggested in some influential studies and thus a direct productivity measures should be used. When Total Factor Productivity is used to rank firms, results suggest that employment in high productivity firms are more cyclically sensitive to unemployment. Besides, the VAR impulse response analysis suggests that workers move up the productivity ladder by moving from new firms with low productivity to old firms with high productivity.

Education and Health, The Sectors of The Future?

In this interactive note, the second issue of the series "The future of work in Latin America and the Caribbean", we analyze the evolution of the labor market in the education and health sectors. Not only do we observe that employment has grown considerably in the last four decades, but that jobs in education and health are good quality jobs -especially for women-. In addition, the study projects the number of teachers, doctors and nurses that the countries of the region will need in the coming years. * For a correct visualization of this note, we recommend the use of the free Adobe Reader and Flash Player programs.

Who Drives on Ride-Hailing Platforms in Latin America?: A Profile of Uber Drivers in Brazil, Chile, Colombia and Mexico

Digital platforms can improve the functioning of markets characterized by coordination problems and high levels of fragmentation, such as the transportation market. In recent years, the adoption of digital platforms across Latin America (Latam), notably in the ride-hailing sector, has been considerable. This expansion may increase the availability of better job alternatives for workers in the region, which is characterized by high levels of informality and citizen’s insecurity. To evaluate the viability of this hypothesis, we explored the characteristics of Uber drivers (UDs) by combining Uber administrative data with a survey designed and applied for this project. The characteristics we analyzed include drivers’ past and current labor profiles, labor aspirations, and financial behaviors.

What Are the Most In-Demand Occupations and Emerging Skills in the Region?

In this interactive note, the third in the series "The future of Work in Latin America and the Caribbean," we combine traditional sources and new data sources to explore the impact that technological change has had on the evolution of occupations and skills demand in the region. In addition, we show the potential of a tool that works as a GPS of the labor market and that gives the opportunity for workers in Latin America and the Caribbean to detect the skills that will allow them to move from a declining occupation to an emerging one. * For a correct visualization of this note, we recommend the use of the free Adobe Reader and Flash Player programs.